Cultura de aprendizaxe

Cultura de aprendizaxe

The Academic Culture and the IT Culture: Their Effect on Teaching and Scholarship

The Academic Culture and the IT Culture: Their Effect on Teaching and Scholarship - A year ago, my colleague Charles Grisham and I wrote an EDUCAUSE Review article entitled "Why IT Has Not Paid Off As We Hoped (Yet)." In short, we argued that information technology has not yet transformed higher education because the areas of teaching and scholarship, the "heart" of colleges and universities, have remained relatively untouched by the new technologies. In this article, I'd like to continue the discussion and also go further, exploring not only why these two areas continue to be, for the most part, resistant to the changes but also how technology can successfully address tFrom [Edu_RSS]

The Academic Culture and the IT Culture: Their Effect on Teaching and Scholarship

The Academic Culture and the IT Culture: Their Effect on Teaching and Scholarship - A year ago, my colleague Charles Grisham and I wrote an EDUCAUSE Review article entitled "Why IT Has Not Paid Off As We Hoped (Yet)." In short, we argued that information technology has not yet transformed higher education because the areas of teaching and scholarship, the "heart" of colleges and universities, have remained relatively untouched by the new technologies. [Distance-Educator.com]

Factors inhibiting change

Factors inhibiting change

On a personal level, change can be exciting - a welcome relief to the monotonous tedium of daily life; it may open new doors, heralding transition to a new and fulfilling developmental stage... On the other hand, change may mark the boundaries of the comfort zone, beyond which lies unknown territory full of nasty little surprises, signposts pointingto more hard work ahead, and holding the real possibility of final failure. Graeme Daniel and Kevin Cox, Web Tools Newsletter, 1 December 2002.

Case studies of organisations with established learning cultures (PDF)

Case studies of organisations with established learning cultures (PDF)

This project reports the approaches used by six Australian organisations to build and maintain a learning culture. The research study identifies pressures which have contributed to the participating organisations' commitment to learning as well as the similar and dissimilar characteristics which allow these organisations to consider themselves as learning organisations. Robyn Johnston, Geof Hawke, NCVER.

Organisational change and Leadership

Organisational change and Leadership

HR Gateway has released its first e-book called Interviews on Organisational Change and Leadership, which can be downloaded free from the home page. The selection of eight interviews is designed to be the start of a debate rather than an endgame in deciding the role of HR in organisational change and leadership. Please feel free to distribute the e-book among colleagues or interested parties, and also to respond to areas where you feel the debate needs to continue. HR Gateway.

A learning culture

A learning culture

A learning culture develops the same way that any culture develops - as an adaptive response to human needs, as series of continually adapting responses to basic human needs. In one sense, we are all constantly learning, and we are all constantly teaching others around us - but some of our ways of learning and teaching are adaptive and healthy, and others are reactionary and unhealthy. We need to learn how to learn well, and how to foster healthy learning, learning that solves problems and offers growth and hope.

Why your organisation isn't learning all it should

Why your organisation isn't learning all it should

Nurses are great at solving immediate problems, but their experience is not often captured to solve larger problems in hospitals. The result? Molehills can quickly turn into mountains. That's one implication of a new HBS working paper by doctoral student Anita Tucker and professors Amy Edmondson and Steven Spear. What's the disconnect? Organizations aren't establishing environments conducive to sharing knowledge. Harvard Business School, Working Knowledge, 30 July 2001.

Good to great

Good to great

I want to give you a lobotomy about change. I want you to forget everything you've ever learned about what it takes to create great results. I want you to realize that nearly all operating prescriptions for creating large-scale corporate change are nothing but myths. Jim Collins, FastCompany.

Creating a learning web culture

Creating a learning web culture

Too often, the reaction of companies first exposed to web technology is to commission a corporate web, place it online, and forget about it. This is like installing a telephone system and then never using it. In this presentation, Dr Ross Williams describes the need for managers, who are serious about the business potential of the web, to accept the web as a platform for change rather than an end in itself, and to build a learning culture that will enable the business to grow with the web instead of being forced to undergo a serious of painful and disruptive revolutions. A presentation by Dr Ross Williams of Rocksoft, 1997.

The age of the learner

The age of the learner

There are two main facets to effective e-learning: the technology required to make it possible, and the modus operandi of the business itself. But, as Martyn Sloman asks, are organisations putting their efforts into the right one? Training Journal, May 2001.

The necessary conditions for a learning culture

The necessary conditions for a learning culture

Since Peter Senge burst on the guru scene in 1990 with his highly popular book The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Science of the Learning Organization, there has been much debate about what it really means to be a learning organization. How do you know if the culture of your organization enhances or inhibits learning? Here is a chart based upon the work of Edgar Schein, one of the top learning organization gurus, that compares the culture of a learning organization to that of the traditional organization. Joseph H Boyott and Jimmie T Boyott.

How to optimize organisational learning

How to optimize organisational learning

Because learning is so seamlessly part of practice, it is not perceived as learning. As a result, practice is often assumed to be either static of else to be chaotic, unstructured and thus randomly adaptable. As a locus of learning, however, practice is neither stubbornly resistant to change nor simply transformable by decree. Though it may not follow the course of traditional linear logic, practice has a logic of it's own. Here are 14 guidelines to help you work with rather than against the inner logic of organizational learning. Etienne Wenger, Healthcare Forum Journal, July/Aug 1996, CoIL - Community Intelligence Labs.

The Interactive Syllabus: A Resource-based, Constructivist Approach To Learning

The Interactive Syllabus: A Resource-based, Constructivist Approach To Learning

O programa dun curso é un aspecto pouco estudiado nas estratexias de deseño da aprendizaxe virtual, estando constituído polo xeral por un texto que replica en formato dixital o seu xemelgo en papel. A maior parte dos cursos en liña préstanlle pouca atención, dado que se entende o programa en termos do calendario tradicional e das funcións administrativas. Na medida en que o programa estructura o curso, a súa concepción nun sentido tradicional limita a innovación. Sen embargo, o programa é o mapa de ruta instruccional do curso, e todas as outras funcionalidades do curso dependen del. Desde unha perspectiva constructivista, un programa debera ser interactivo, ofrecendo aos aprendices un portal pedagóxicamente rico en torno aos materiais que constitúen a base para a investigación de curso. Sylive L. F. Richards, Syllabus

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